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Azuki Jelly with Maccha Whipping Cream Desert

Azuki Jelly with Maccha Whipped Cream Desert

There were some more sweetened Shiruko Azuki crashed in the blender about 10 days ago in the fridge, I heated it up again with gelatin again to make Azuki jelly desert.

Maccha Whipping Cream on Azuki Jelly

Maccha Whipped Cream on Azuki Jelly

On top of the Azuki desert I whipped cream with Maccha green tea powder. The both traditional Japanese taste for sweets harmonise perfectly together with the Maccha tea.

The key point for the Maccha whipping cream is the ratios of the ingredients as follows:

Ingredients of Maccha Whipping Cream:

  • 100cc of whipping cream
  • 15g of sugar
  • 1 tea spoon of Maccha green tea powder 
Maccha Whipping Cream Ingredients

Maccha Whipping Cream Ingredients

The above ingredients are beaten with electric mixer, put the mixing bowl on another bowl with water and ice to keep the ingredients chilled so that the cream satisfactorily firm.

Whipping Cream Beaten on Chilled Bowl

Whipping Cream Beaten on Chilled Bowl

Many whiping cream in sweets sold in the UK such as eclairs and choux buns seem to use less sugar to make the whipped cream as the filling and is not tasty at all to me.

I presume this ratio of whipping cream ingredients is more or less the same as the popular cream puff shops called Beard Papa, which have many shops in large cities in the world.

It is worth trying if you have not ever tasted yet and tell me what you taste.

I will make strawberry cream tomorrow to try making popular cake in Japan.

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It has been warm nice days lately. As there is a lot of Shiruko Azuki Soup left from yesterday, I made Azuki Jelly today. 

Azuki Jelly with Maccha Tea

Azuki Jelly with Maccha Tea

I used gelatin instead of Kuzu or Kanten to firm in Jelly texture as the taste would be the same. 

Azuki Jelly and Maccha Green Tea

Azuki Jelly and Maccha Green Tea

If Kanten or Kuzu are used it will be the traditional Mizu-Yokan dessert in summer and they are slightly elastically firmer.

 Maccha is powdered green tea leaves and is traditionally used to make thick tea for Japanese tea ceremonies on traditional or regional occasions.

For 1 cup of Maccha tea, use 2g of Maccha powder and pour 60 ml of hot water at around 95°C and mix with the Maccha whisk.

I rather would like to taste Maccha sweets, however, when Japanese traditional sweets are accompanied, Maccha tea is a perfect combination with such sweets.

I took some photos to show images of Japanese tea ceremony in the mixture of modern and Japanese kitchen stuff which were available in the UK.

There is some more Azuki soup left, what else will I make tomorrow….?

Shiruko Azuki in Blender

Shiruko Azuki in Blender

Shiruko Azuki Strained after Crushed in Blender

Shiruko Azuki Strained after Crushed in Blender

Strained Shiruko Azuki Soup with Gelatine Cooked

Strained Shiruko Azuki Soup with Gelatine Cooked

Azuki Jelly in Dessert Cases

Azuki Jelly in Dessert Cases

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Cool Summer Shiruko Azuki Dessert

Cool Summer Shiruko Azuki Dessert

Cooled Shiruko Azuki Dessert Close-UP

Cooled Shiruko Azuki Dessert Close-UP

I boiled Azuki beans the day before yesterday.

Dried Azuki Beans

Dried Azuki Beans

Azuki Beans Boiled

Azuki Beans Boiled

Azuki beans are cooked in boiling water without soaking in water beforehand.

Azuki Beans Being Boiled with New Water

Azuki Beans Being Boiled with New Water

Once again the water becomes boiling after adding the Azuki beans, throw the water and change with new water.

Cook for 1 to 1.5 hour in a low heat.

Add 250g to 300g of sugar and continue to cook 30 more minutes.

Use the above sweeten Azuki beans to make Japanese traditional desserts.

Shiratama Dango Dumpling for Shiruko Azuki Dessert

Shiratama Dango Dumpling for Shiruko Azuki Dessert

Today I made Shiruko Azuki dessert with Shiratama flour and flour dumpling. The flour are mixed with sugar, water then kneaded dumplings are boiled in water for a couple of minutes. The above picture is Shiratama dumplings cooked down in icy water after they are boiled. Flour dumplings are added straight into Shiruko soup.

It is usually served hot and often eaten in winter season, but I cooled in icy water today for a summer dessert.

There are some thicker Azuki beans summer desserts such as Mitsumame, Zenzai, the Maccha Latte Dessert I made on the other day and more.

If you like Azuki desserts, it is worth cooking dried Azuki beans, rather than buying the tinned ready made Azuki beans for desserts.

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It reached 27 °c this afternoon in London. I felt it was more than 30°c like in Japan as it was rather humid and sticky since I got up in the early morning.

When humid summer comes in London, we miss air conditioning here and there. Even the rude cats came in our house to seek cooler places.

Maccha Latte Jelly Dessert Close UP

Maccha Latte Jelly Dessert Close UP

I made Maccha green tea latte jelly below to cool down dessert after dinner.

Maccha Latte Jelly Ingredients

Maccha Latte Jelly Ingredients

I used Shiratamako rice flour with sugar for Maccha dumpling. Creme, sugar and water are for jelly.

Maccha Shiratama Dumpling Mixing

Maccha Shiratama Dumpling Mixing

Shiratama Dumpling Kneaded

Shiratama Dumpling Kneaded

The tinned Azuki beans already cooked with a lot of sugar for desserts and I tasted and make green colour with the Maccha green tea powder.

Maccha Shiratama Dumpling Cooking in Boiling Water

Maccha Shiratama Dumpling Cooking in Boiling Water

Maccha Shiratama Dumpling Cooled in Cold Water

Maccha Shiratama Dumpling Cooled in Cold Water

Maccha Latte Jelly Dessert

Maccha Latte Jelly Dessert

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This is one of the traditional Japanese dishes, a kind of Oden, the warm and deep pot dish with vegetables and fried ground fish cakes boiled in bonito and kelp stock water with soy sauce, sake, sugar.

Furofuki Daikon

Furofuki Daikon

I remember that this kind of dish is often cooked at home especially in winter in Japan, however, as I was able to buy one whole mooli in good freshness on the other day, I decided to cook Furofuki Daikon this time.

Ingredients of Furofuki Daikon for 4 servings :

for Daikon Mooli Pot

  • 2/3 of whole mooli, peeled and sliced in 2 to 2.5 cm width
  • 400 ml of bonito fish and kelp stock
  • 1/2 to 1 table spoon of sugar
  • 50 ml of  Sake
  • 1 table spoon of soy sauce

for Minced Chicken Sauce

  • 150 g chicken minced and fried without oil in a non-stick pan
  • 2 table spoons of water
  • 1 table spoon of sugar
  • 2 table spoons of sake
  • 1 table spoon of soy sauce

for Thickening Sauce

  • 1 and half table spoons of potato starch put in 2 table spoons of water

for Relish

  • Thinly sliced ginger – a little

 

Mooli and Chicken Breast

Mooli and Chicken Breast

Chicken Brest to be Minced

Chicken Breast to be Minced

Minced Chicken Fried without Oil

Minced Chicken Fried without Oil

I personally shortcut in preparing the fish stock that I boil kelp, dried shredded bonito in about double amount of the water we would like to have as stock, i.e. 800 ml in this case, together with the Daikon Mooli in medium heat.

Japanese Stock - Kelp and Bonito with Mooli

Japanese Stock - Kelp and Bonito with Mooli

Just after the stock water has started boiling with small bubbles coming up, remove the kelp and continue to boil the stock with mooli. After a couple of minutes of boiling time, turn the heat off and leave it for 20 minutes.

I do not really mind how much stock I now have got, as long as I have more than 400 ml and I adjust the amount of the seasonings.

After removing the shredded bonito, resume to cook the mooli in medium heat first and then in low heat.

Mooli Cooked in Kelp and Bonito Stock

Mooli Cooked in Kelp and Bonito Stock

Season the mooli, in order of sugar, sake and then once the alcohol smell has gone, add soy sauce and continue to cook in low heat for at least 15 minutes.

Season the fried minced chicken in order again – water, sugar, sake and once the alcohol smell has gone, soy sauce.

If you prefer mooli tasted with sauce well, turn the both heat off and leave for a couple of hours.

About 15 minutes before serving the meal, re-heat both pans in low heat and add chicken to the one with mooli.

Once it is boiled, dish up the mooli on deeper plates and keep them warm.

Add potato starch water and continue to stir the sauce for 3 minutes on medium heat. If too much water had evaporated, you could add some more water. Due to the dry climate in the UK, meals also get dried quicker than those get dried in Japan.

Continue to cook the chicken sauce 1 more minute in low heat and then pour the sauce on the mooli.

If you do not dislike, I recommend to put thinly sliced ginger to make a lively taste.

In addition, please use fresh mooli as some large supermarkets do not sell it in the UK or sell very old, dry mooli, often in high street vegetable market shops.

Old mooli have have developped fibre like hard strings and we can not cut them by chewing in mouth.

A little bitter taste of mooli may make people who eat mooli for the first time away from it, however, I believe as long as you are able to choose right ingredients and follow the overall recipes, you will like the one you cooked.

Good Luck!

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I had a cup of lemon tea outside in this afternoon.

In the UK, most of people love milk tea and so do I, it was fresh and a nice change to prepare for bargains over the coming weekend. 

I expect products will be sold at reasonable prices in the UK, ideally half price for most of products and services – for god the sake, at least for bargains shops should be able to offer to meet the global standard!

Afternoon Lemon Tea

Afternoon Lemon Tea

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It was a gorgeous day as it has reached 23 degrees for the most of the long summer day today. It seems there will be even hotter days in the rest of this week.

On such a hot day, cold dishes are very welcome. I cooked the quick Somen noodles below at lunch.

Somen Noodles

Somen Noodles

The ingredients for one serving are:

  • 100g to 200g of Japanese Somen noodles
  • 100 cc of high quality Somen Tsuyu – soy sauce with stock and seasonings ready for Somen noodles
  • a small handful amount of grated ginger
  • a small handful amount of sliced Shiso herb
  • around 5g of freshly roasted Japanese white sesame seeds

The above amounts are just for an example and you can adjust them as you prefer. You also would like to add finely sliced spring onions instead of Shiso herb which is difficult to find in the UK.

Somen Noodles Ingredients

Somen Noodles Ingredients

I bought in a Japanese food shop in London but disappointingly, they were a little hard and dry. I have learned that when Shiso herbs are grown in poor soil, the leaves tend to be hard and dry.

I wish I would have much larger garden for the kitchen garden.

As you can see this is very simple and quick dish, so the quality of the ingredients are so important for better taste.

Put some or all of the relish – ginger, Shiso and sesame in the Somen Tsuyu bowl first and bring one bite size of somen noodles into the Some Tsuyu bowl and eat it.

As well as the better quality Somen noodles, the Some Tsuyu sauce should also be in better quality and even the sesame seeds should also be preferably Japanese one which can be found in Japanese food shops.

Somen Tsuyu are made up of soy sauce, bonito and kelp stock, sake, mirin, sugar and others, so it can be homemade, but as it has to be left one night to get mature taste after cooking the sauce, I prefer buying ready-to-use sauce.

As long as I keep one bottle in the fridge, I can use the sauce straight away and therefore it just take 5 minutes to prepare everything.

If you choose rather thin somen noodles like the one in the photo above, it just take a minute in boiling water.

While you will feel cool, fresh taste and mind, it is also good to you as the ginger will keep your cold organs chilled by the Somen noodles warm. 

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