Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Noodles’ Category

I cooked Ankake Yakisoba recently. Ankake in this case means thick soy sauce made from potato flour and other Japanese and Chinese seasonings.

Vegetable Ankake Yakisoba Close-Up

Vegetable Ankake Yakisoba Close-Up

This is one of the popular noodles in Japan and they usually put squid, prawns and pork slices as well as vegetables, however, since I watched the film called Pandemic, I imagine the infected prawns which are forcefully grown beautifully with excessive use of bleach, by clearing many mangrove forests in South Asia.

The infected mangrove forests caused the global pandemic in the movie and even it makes me subcounciously fear as I watched it in May this year, when the H1N1 flu warnings were on the media at peak.

I do not want think about other farms of food and so far, I am just avoiding prawns and instead, I use baby shrimps if I need.

Thus this time, I made Ankake Yakisoba with vegetables only. Some time, I will cook with some kind of meat.

 

 

 

Vegetable Ankake Yakisoba Ingredients + Soy, Sesame Oil

Vegetable Ankake Yakisoba Ingredients + Soy, Sesame Oil

 

 

for serves 2

Ingredients of Vegetable Ankake Yakisoba :

  • vegetables of your choice and 2 eggs
  • 2 packets boiled Yakisoba noodles
  • 1 table spoon sesame seeds, 1 table spoon sesame oil

and,

for Ankake Sauce – mix below ingredients except for potato flour and water in advance :

  • 2 tea spoons of oyster sauce
  • 2 tea spoons of pork and chicken stock cube, or 400 ml of pork and chicken stock instead of adding water
  • 400 ml of warm water
  • 2 table spoons of soy sauce
  • 2 table spoons of potato flour with 3 table spoons of water, mixed

Vegetables are chopped into pieces. I have however, boiled mangetout, carrots and broad beans for 1 minute and cauliflowers for 3 to 4 minutes, as my poor cooker does not have enough high heat for such frying dish which are suitable to use wok and wok burners.

Yakisoba being Fried for Ankake

Yakisoba being Fried for Ankake

Fry noodles with a little excess oil, i.e. with about 5 table spoons of oil and loosen up the noodles and shape in round and continue to fry in medium heat until the edge shows in golden brown.

Yakisoba Fried for Ankake

Yakisoba Fried for Ankake

Turn around the round noodle cake and when both sides are cooked in golden brown colour, dish up on plates.

While cooking the noodles above, start frying vegetables in high heat and when they are half cooked, add the mixture of the Ankake sauce and continue to cook in medium heat for a couple of minutes.

Ankake Sauce Cooked

Ankake Sauce Cooked

Add well-mixed potato flour with water in the pan and continuously stir in high heat for 3 minutes and 1 more minute stirring in low heat.

Add sesame seeds and sesame oil and turn off the heat.

Vegetable Ankake Yakisoba

Vegetable Ankake Yakisoba

Dish up on the noodles and enjoy it. The crispy texture of the fried noodles with the thick soy base Chinese / Japanese sauce are only one of the popular noodle dishes in Japan.

There are much more delicious noodles and other dishes I would like to introduce soon.

Bookmark and Share

Read Full Post »

It was a gorgeous day as it has reached 23 degrees for the most of the long summer day today. It seems there will be even hotter days in the rest of this week.

On such a hot day, cold dishes are very welcome. I cooked the quick Somen noodles below at lunch.

Somen Noodles

Somen Noodles

The ingredients for one serving are:

  • 100g to 200g of Japanese Somen noodles
  • 100 cc of high quality Somen Tsuyu – soy sauce with stock and seasonings ready for Somen noodles
  • a small handful amount of grated ginger
  • a small handful amount of sliced Shiso herb
  • around 5g of freshly roasted Japanese white sesame seeds

The above amounts are just for an example and you can adjust them as you prefer. You also would like to add finely sliced spring onions instead of Shiso herb which is difficult to find in the UK.

Somen Noodles Ingredients

Somen Noodles Ingredients

I bought in a Japanese food shop in London but disappointingly, they were a little hard and dry. I have learned that when Shiso herbs are grown in poor soil, the leaves tend to be hard and dry.

I wish I would have much larger garden for the kitchen garden.

As you can see this is very simple and quick dish, so the quality of the ingredients are so important for better taste.

Put some or all of the relish – ginger, Shiso and sesame in the Somen Tsuyu bowl first and bring one bite size of somen noodles into the Some Tsuyu bowl and eat it.

As well as the better quality Somen noodles, the Some Tsuyu sauce should also be in better quality and even the sesame seeds should also be preferably Japanese one which can be found in Japanese food shops.

Somen Tsuyu are made up of soy sauce, bonito and kelp stock, sake, mirin, sugar and others, so it can be homemade, but as it has to be left one night to get mature taste after cooking the sauce, I prefer buying ready-to-use sauce.

As long as I keep one bottle in the fridge, I can use the sauce straight away and therefore it just take 5 minutes to prepare everything.

If you choose rather thin somen noodles like the one in the photo above, it just take a minute in boiling water.

While you will feel cool, fresh taste and mind, it is also good to you as the ginger will keep your cold organs chilled by the Somen noodles warm. 

Bookmark and Share

Read Full Post »

Yakisoba Noodles

Yakisoba Noodles

I have bought Yakisoba noodles below recently from Japanese food shop in London.

We can find similar Chinese ones in large supermarkets in the UK, however, as the Chinese ones tend to have much less elastic texture than Japanese ones, I do not buy from the supermarkets.

Perhaps Japanese noodles are kneaded differently and the ingredients of the noodles are also different.

Bean sprouts are often included in Yakisoba noodles, but as it seems they use bleach to keep looks of bean sprouts sold in the UK whiter and fresher for longer, I do not use them.

Bean sprouts are very cheap and it usually starts to go off in a couple of days, but bean sprouts bought in supermarkets in the UK lasts their appearance fresh for at least 2 weeks or more, I have discovered.

So the ingredients for Yakisoba this time were eggs, onions, cabbage and German ham. As German Brunswick ham or similar hams usually do not have smell of farms but most of other traditional hams sold in supermarkets in the UK have, I often buy the German ones with relief.

As I reach the opportunity to mention about German Brunswick ham, I found new similar product a couple months ago as the photo above. On the products they say:

  • German Brunswick ham – I usually buy from some supermarkets in the UK.

Succulent slices of Westphalian ham formed from selected cuts of pork, cured, cooked and smoked over Beechwood.

  • Oven baked German ham slices – New products I have tried recently.

Tender slices of oven baked ham, formed from selected cuts of pork.

It tasted that oven baked ones were not as tasty as the original German Brunswick ham as the oven baked ones miss smoke flavour.

At the time I took the photo it seems they have introduced the what looks like the second-rate products at the same price as the first-rate products to get larger profit margin from the second-rate products than from the first-rate ones.

I wonder if they will discontinue the first-rate products in the supermarkets sooner or later, which is one of the typical techniques to make larger profits by the companies in the UK, leaving the consumers and customers with lower standard of products and services. 

In the middle of the global recession, companies with higher level of services and products at reasonable prices must be able to thrive to recover from the distorted economies.

 

Bookmark and Share

Read Full Post »

We went to Seoul, Korea lately and had Korean noodles below.

Actually, due to the H1N1 flu, until we arrive at the town city of Seoul, we had anxiety about the trip to Seoul, with masks tidily on our faces.

We gave up exploring fresh fish market and had the Korean noodles. However, the noodle was moderately thick and had modest textures, the soup was tasteful with spicy seasonings such as garlic, Korean chili and some herbs.

As it was really short trip and therefore we could not take photos of other meals such as Bibimbap, the rice with meat and vegetables topping and spicy orange colour seasonings. If I go there next time, I would like to explore actively without much anxiety like this time.

Bookmark and Share

Read Full Post »

Udon Noodles うどん

Udon Noodles うどん

Udon is another popular light noodles and is often eaten at lunch.

There are some similar noodles in other area of Asia, however, most of them have less elastic texture which is not accepted by most of Japanese.

However, the adequate level of the elastic texture and the best balance with flavour and taste which should be developed by the Udon makers.

Japanese often give reciprocal presents at wide variety of occasions and we have been given Udon noodles some time ago. Those presents are often branded products, otherwise they are selected carefully to hope that the recipient will like it. The Udon noodles were from a famous brand.

Today, we put Sakura-Ebi, baby prawns which are taken in April and October in the sea around Japan. The seasoning is thin soy sauce soup, made with fish stock, sake, mirin, soy sauce.
Bookmark and Share

Read Full Post »